30 Days of Video Games

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I don’t normally do these 30 day challenges- work and life get in the way of me spending time writing and pondering on the topics. Then I saw several bloggers in my feed taking part in this one, including fellow Completionist Thero. So I joined in.

The list of topics for each day is as follows:

Day 1 – Very first video game.
Day 2 – Your favorite character.
Day 3 – A game that is underrated.
Day 4 – Your guilty pleasure game.
Day 5 – Game character you feel you are most like (or wish you were).
Day 6 – Most annoying character.
Day 7 – Favorite game couple.
Day 8 – Best soundtrack.
Day 9 – Saddest game scene.
Day 10 – Best gameplay.
Day 11 – Gaming system of choice.
Day 12 – A game everyone should play.
Day 13 – A game you’ve played more than five times.
Day 14 – Current (or most recent) gaming wallpaper.
Day 15 – Post a screenshot from the game you’re playing right now.
Day 16 – Game with the best cut scenes.
Day 17 – Favorite antagonist.
Day 18 – Favorite protagonist.
Day 19 – Picture of a game setting you wish you lived in.
Day 20 – Favorite genre.
Day 21 – Game with the best story.
Day 22 – A game sequel which disappointed you.
Day 23 – Game you think had the best graphics or art style.
Day 24 – Favorite classic game.
Day 25 – A game you plan on playing.
Day 26 – Best voice acting.
Day 27 – Most epic scene ever.
Day 28 – Favorite game developer.
Day 29 – A game you thought you wouldn’t like, but ended up loving.
Day 30 – Your favourite game of all time.

Let’s Go!

Day 1: Very first video game

My gaming hobby started young, like many in the gaming community. The family computer was the source of that hobby, most likely starting with My First Amazing World Explorer. I wouldn’t technically class this as a game since a large part of it was educational, teaching the small Khinjarsi about the world. Ask me about jerboas, go on.

If we discount those edutainment programs, I can narrow my first game down to one of two PC games, for Windows 95. Barbie Adventure Riding Club, and Lego Loco.

Can you tell which was mine?

For kid games they weren’t terrible. Lego Loco was a neat little top down city builder with mini figs and trains. It was played a lot by both me and my brother (he liked lego and trains) and even now it’s not a bad place to start kids gaming, assuming you can get a hold of it. It’s fairly simple, but not overly complicated, and was a pleasant way to spend some time honing my city building skills. Build a small town, complete with mini fig residents, and help those mini figs get around on the railway network. That trusty, most reliable of public transport options (ha!). The best part of the train network was sending and receivig postcards from other people playing. Via your dial up internet, you could, if your parents were ok with you dialling up that internet connection, design a little card with stamps (it was neat actually), and send it with a message elsewhere. Back in the relative infancy of the internet, messages were mild and mostly from the game itself. Still, it was fun to do.

Barbie Riding Club was a very different game. For obvious reasons. You kept horses (I seem to recall mine were mostly called peppermint and strawberry, though not out of choice) and rode them around the local area which somehow included a race track, beach and forest. It did its best to give us small cut scenes, 1st person riding  (there’s still not enough of this in games) and still had enough in it to present a story about a wild horse and an abandoned house.

You care for your horse, race it, feed it and generally faff about in a horsey kind of way. It wasn’t anything new or ground breaking, but it was fine for a kids game in the 90s. The story element stopped me getting too bored with the mini games and racing elements, and there was just enough of a sense of open world riding that my young self felt I could ride where I wanted. Barbie Riding Club was the only Barbie game I had as a kid, although many more were created, but I definitely think it influenced my love of open world games, and of first person riding in games.

 

It’s hard to narrow down specifically what my first games were. I had several that I could play, many of which I can relive through Youtube. Many were edutainment programs on a variety of subjects from ancient history to maths and geography. Consoles came a few years into my childhood – I played on Sega Megadrives at friends houses, but the first console for the family was Sony’s Playstation. But that’s a story for another day.

 

Tomorrow we look at my favourite character from all my years of gaming. I better get my thinking cap on.

Khin

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