Braveland – Not Quite Disneyland…

Braveland is the first in a trilogy of fantasy turn-based strategy games by Tortuga Team. I love turn-based strategy, almost as much as I love RPGs, so join me on a quest to see if this game is worth playing.

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A world full of adventure!

In Braveland, you play the son of a warrior whose village is attacked by bandits. This event leads you on a journey across the land seeking justice for the crimes that have been committed.
Plot-wise, this game is average and very predictable. Don’t expect any plot twists or any real character development, but do expect every fantasy cliché to be covered over the course of the game. The redeeming aspect of the plot is that Braveland is very aware of how cliché it is and is self-referential in the characters’ dialogue.

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One of the battles in the game.

The gameplay is very easy to pick up: you click on one of your units and then click on the space, or enemy, you want to move to, or attack.
To be honest the game is easy to learn, but a bit harder to master. The units range from warriors, to archers, to healers. For some reason you don’t get access to mages or assassins, even though they feature as enemies within the game. There is also a lack of cavalry units for you.
This does limit your strategies and the way you approach each battle. Each unit has a special ability they can activate, but the abilities all have fairly long cooldown timers and can’t be upgraded after their initial purchase; this essentially makes them one use abilities per battle.
The other unique aspect is the use of battle magic. Every time one of your units gets hit, you earn a fury point which can be spent on magic skills, such as launching flaming arrows at an enemy unit. Compared to other turn-based strategy games, Bravelands combat is very simple with very little opportunity for the player employ any complex tactics.

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Upgrading your hero is pretty straight forward…

Another area that the game is limited in is the customisation of your hero. After every battle, you earn experience points and can level up your hero, which helps improve your stats and expands your army. But you can’t improve your battle magic or the skills of your units.
You can purchase equipment, twelve pieces in total, which steadily improve over the course of the game. You aren’t given any choice in how they advance, just the option to upgrade. This lack of choice combined with the lack of tactical options does limit the replayability of Braveland.

The cartoon art style, combined with the soundtrack, are definitely positives for the game. Both compliment the simplistic gameplay and definitely reinforce the idea that Braveland is a more, dare I say, casual game with aspects of turn-based strategy.
Overall the game took me less than five hours to complete. Whilst it has around fifty battles for you to play, you can’t actually repeat the battles upon completion, which brings me back to the point that this game has very limited replayability.

I enjoyed Braveland.
It has a certain charm about it, however I believe that if you have played other turn-based strategy games, like the Fire Emblem series for instance, then this game probably won’t challenge you. While the game does have limited replayability, I believe it offers reasonable value for money, as it is nicely polished.
Personally, I would be looking to play the two games in the series and I would recommend this game to people who perhaps haven’t played turn-based strategy before and want to try the mechanics out before buying a more expensive game.

Braveland is available on PC, iOS and Android.

Thero doesn’t want a son of a warrior coming after her, thinking she was a bandit, so she would like to note that all the pictures on this page can be found at tortugateam.com
Last played on 28/02/16 for Steam.
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